The Circle Trilogy
The Circle Trilogy
The Circle Trilogy
The Circle Trilogy
Now Shipping Internationally!

The Circle Trilogy

Regular price $ 65.97 Sale price $ 39.99
/
Individual

Explore the Circle Trilogy

Buy the 3 book bundle and SAVE!

Black:

Some say the world hangs in the balance of every choice we make. Now the fate of two worlds hangs in the balance of one man's choices in this adrenaline-laced epic where dreams and reality collide.

Fleeing assailants through deserted alleyways, Thomas Hunter narrowly escapes to the roof of a building. Then a silent bullet from the night clips his head . . . and his world goes black.

From the blackness comes an amazing reality of another world where evil is contained. A world where Thomas Hunter is in love with a beautiful woman.

But then he remembers the dream of being chased through an alleyway as he reaches to touch the blood on his head. Where does the dream end and reality begin?

Every time he falls asleep in one world, he awakes in the other. Yet in both, catastrophic disaster awaits him . . . may even be caused by him.

From New York Times bestselling author Ted Dekker, experience the novel that launched The Circle and first invited readers to dive deep.

Red:

“We have stepped off the cliff and are falling into madness.”

The mind-bending pace of Black accelerates in Red, book two of the Circle Series. Less than a month ago, Thomas Hunter was a failed writer selling coffee at the Java Hut in Denver. Now he finds himself in a desperate quest to rescue two worlds from collapse. In one world, he's a battle-scarred general commanding an army of primitive warriors. In the other, he's racing to outwit sadistic terrorists intent on creating global chaos through an unstoppable virus.

Two worlds on the brink of destruction. One unthinkable solution.

Enter an adrenaline-laced epic where dreams and reality collide. Nothing is as it seems, as Black turns to Red.

White:

Time Is Running Out In Two Realities.

In one world, a lethal virus threatens to destroy all life as scientists and governments scramble to find an antidote. In the other, a forbidden love could forever destroy the ragtag resistance known as The Circle.

Thomas can bridge both worlds, but he is quickly realizing that he may not be able to save either.

In this mind-bending adventure, Thomas must find a way to rewrite history as he navigates a whirlwind of emotions and events surrounding a pending apocalypse.

The fate of two worlds comes down to one man's choice--and it is a most unlikely choice indeed. Life. Death. Love. Nothing is as it seems. Yet all will forever be transformed by the decisions of one man in the final hours of the Great Pursuit.

REVIEWS

Customer Reviews

Based on 14 reviews
86%
(12)
14%
(2)
0%
(0)
0%
(0)
0%
(0)
D
Debbie Davis
Excellent!

I'm not a very eloquent writer, like some of these other reviews, but I wanted to share my thoughts. I read the trilogy years ago and have reread them since. These books are amazing, and they have helped change how I view God, His Love and His character. Ted Dekker is my favorite author and I've never read a book of his that I didn't love!

P
Professor
An enjoyable read and a good, climactic end to a trilogy

While I know "The Circle" series has received a fourth book, book zero (what is that about?), for the purposes of this review, I will treat "White" as the conclusion to a trilogy for two reasons. Firstly, this was the original context in which it was published and second, it is the most equitable way to deal with it. It continues the allegory of the Christian faith through history, blending modern-earth and future-earth storylines. The modern-day story is once again a nail-biting narrative and, frankly, where the real story happens. Unfortunately, this makes the future world storyline feel like dead weight at times. Also, because it vies with the present-day story for literary real estate, a relatively small amount of background for this incredibly unique world has left some parts underdeveloped. For example, the people of one culture hate water; however, I never truly understood the depth of their hatred, because I was told about it, not shown it. Another small critique concerns the Books of the Histories, a plot device introduced early in the series and undoubtedly of incredible importance. They are built up to be the driving force in the story, yet they are rarely seen and even more rarely used for anything. Moreover, at the end of "White," they have created a host of loose ends which take away from an otherwise good ending to the series. On the front of characters, the book surpasses its predecessors with the variety of people in the storyline. The villains of the future storyline are finally humanized and given depth and variety. Some of them are evil to the core while some are more like you and me. Additionally, differences of opinion among the heroes make them each feel unique. On the other hand, some characters behave in certain ways, not because it is what they would actually do but because the allegory demands it. One character, for instance, displays uncontrollable and unconditional love as an allegory for the way God loves sinners; however, with nothing preceding this attitude to justify it, the situation undermines the character’s personality simply to make a point. My most critical gripe is that "The Circle" trilogy over-uses death as a plot point and then utilizes poorly conceived resurrection gimmicks to bring characters back. It happens with such frequency that by the third book, the ultimate sacrifice has been cheapened to the point of being practically meaningless. As always, Mr. Dekker’s writing style is all his own, a good thing in my opinion. It melds easy to read English and sentence structures with the occasional use of older, more epic styles of writing. Combine Stephen King with Shakespeare or the Bible and you have Ted Dekker. This creates an easily devoured novel with a readily identifiable style all its own. Despite a few critiques, "White" is an enjoyable read and a good, climactic end to a trilogy.

S
Sarah Demchy

The Circle Trilogy

P
Professor
An explosive start to a promising series

"Black" begins a series of epic proportions, building a bridge between this world and one of the far future. The unique story blends the modern day and fantasy in a way unlike any have done before. Flip-flopping back and forth from world to world could have been a confusing experience, but it is handled with such care that there is time to adjust to the nuances of the storytelling technique. As action builds over the course of the book, the reader is able to take it in stride, right up to the cliff-hanging climax. The modern-day storyline is fast paced with plentiful action while the story taking place in the other world is slow by comparison. This approach was wise as it allows the reader to fully explore and appreciate the intricately designed world, but it also has a downside. At times, the difference in pacing between the storylines can be uncomfortable, and it sometimes feels like the fantasy story is being stretched simply to spread out over the full runtime of the modern-day story. Additionally, it is incredibly obvious when Mr. Dekker is writing about topics of which he does not have sufficient knowledge. A glaring example of this is when the story involves government agencies or the military. This gripe is certainly captious in nature, but it is a pet peeve for me because of my background. Nevertheless, despite a few detractors, intriguing characters, engrossing worlds, and a captivating storyline make this book a solid choice for anyone interested in the genre.

T
The Bookworm
So good!

These books are so good!

Customer Reviews

Based on 14 reviews
86%
(12)
14%
(2)
0%
(0)
0%
(0)
0%
(0)
D
Debbie Davis
Excellent!

I'm not a very eloquent writer, like some of these other reviews, but I wanted to share my thoughts. I read the trilogy years ago and have reread them since. These books are amazing, and they have helped change how I view God, His Love and His character. Ted Dekker is my favorite author and I've never read a book of his that I didn't love!

P
Professor
An enjoyable read and a good, climactic end to a trilogy

While I know "The Circle" series has received a fourth book, book zero (what is that about?), for the purposes of this review, I will treat "White" as the conclusion to a trilogy for two reasons. Firstly, this was the original context in which it was published and second, it is the most equitable way to deal with it. It continues the allegory of the Christian faith through history, blending modern-earth and future-earth storylines. The modern-day story is once again a nail-biting narrative and, frankly, where the real story happens. Unfortunately, this makes the future world storyline feel like dead weight at times. Also, because it vies with the present-day story for literary real estate, a relatively small amount of background for this incredibly unique world has left some parts underdeveloped. For example, the people of one culture hate water; however, I never truly understood the depth of their hatred, because I was told about it, not shown it. Another small critique concerns the Books of the Histories, a plot device introduced early in the series and undoubtedly of incredible importance. They are built up to be the driving force in the story, yet they are rarely seen and even more rarely used for anything. Moreover, at the end of "White," they have created a host of loose ends which take away from an otherwise good ending to the series. On the front of characters, the book surpasses its predecessors with the variety of people in the storyline. The villains of the future storyline are finally humanized and given depth and variety. Some of them are evil to the core while some are more like you and me. Additionally, differences of opinion among the heroes make them each feel unique. On the other hand, some characters behave in certain ways, not because it is what they would actually do but because the allegory demands it. One character, for instance, displays uncontrollable and unconditional love as an allegory for the way God loves sinners; however, with nothing preceding this attitude to justify it, the situation undermines the character’s personality simply to make a point. My most critical gripe is that "The Circle" trilogy over-uses death as a plot point and then utilizes poorly conceived resurrection gimmicks to bring characters back. It happens with such frequency that by the third book, the ultimate sacrifice has been cheapened to the point of being practically meaningless. As always, Mr. Dekker’s writing style is all his own, a good thing in my opinion. It melds easy to read English and sentence structures with the occasional use of older, more epic styles of writing. Combine Stephen King with Shakespeare or the Bible and you have Ted Dekker. This creates an easily devoured novel with a readily identifiable style all its own. Despite a few critiques, "White" is an enjoyable read and a good, climactic end to a trilogy.

S
Sarah Demchy

The Circle Trilogy

P
Professor
An explosive start to a promising series

"Black" begins a series of epic proportions, building a bridge between this world and one of the far future. The unique story blends the modern day and fantasy in a way unlike any have done before. Flip-flopping back and forth from world to world could have been a confusing experience, but it is handled with such care that there is time to adjust to the nuances of the storytelling technique. As action builds over the course of the book, the reader is able to take it in stride, right up to the cliff-hanging climax. The modern-day storyline is fast paced with plentiful action while the story taking place in the other world is slow by comparison. This approach was wise as it allows the reader to fully explore and appreciate the intricately designed world, but it also has a downside. At times, the difference in pacing between the storylines can be uncomfortable, and it sometimes feels like the fantasy story is being stretched simply to spread out over the full runtime of the modern-day story. Additionally, it is incredibly obvious when Mr. Dekker is writing about topics of which he does not have sufficient knowledge. A glaring example of this is when the story involves government agencies or the military. This gripe is certainly captious in nature, but it is a pet peeve for me because of my background. Nevertheless, despite a few detractors, intriguing characters, engrossing worlds, and a captivating storyline make this book a solid choice for anyone interested in the genre.

T
The Bookworm
So good!

These books are so good!